Connect with us

Scam News

John McAfee: Twitter Never Responds To Crypto Scam Tweets

Published

on

John McAfee- Twitter Never Responds To Crypto Scam Tweets

John McAfee: Twitter Never Responds To Crypto Scam Tweets

 

In recent days it has been brought to light, a series of misadventures of an insidious scammer pretending to be none other than John McAfee.

MCAFEE: TWITTER NEVER EVEN RESPONDS TO MY CRYPTO SCAM REPORTS

Mr. John McAfee responded by sharing his frustration with an issue that continues to plague the crypto community at large: Twitter bitcoin scams.

McAfee said:

“This happens three or four times a day where people pretending to be me on various platforms, attempt to scam people using a variety of scams.”

 

“On my Twitter account everyone of my tweets are peppered with comments from people pretending to be me and attempting to get people to send Bitcoin or Ethereum in exchange for a larger amount. I no longer bother to report them to Twitter because I never get a response.”

Twitter has the paradoxical reputation of being both incredibly resourceful and annoyingly frustrating. Influencers find it increasingly difficult to wade through the information swamp only to interact with their genuine followers.

CALLS GROW LOUDER FOR AN END TO TWITTER BITCOIN SCAMS

Bitcoin giveaway scams have plagued accounts belonging to everyone from Elon Musk to Pope Francis. 

Popular tweets have a long history of scammy responders. By now you’d think they’d have nipped the issue in the bud. It’s been more than a year since CEO Jack Dorsey promised to tackle the problem quickly.

If anything, the situation has actually become worse. CNBC Crypto Trader host Ran Neuner recently echoed McAfee’s sentiment by calling Dorsey out for wasting resources developing a controversial new user interfacewhile these scams continue to exploit novice crypto users.

Ran NeuNer@cryptomanran

Hey @jack , instead of giving us a new UI that is worse than the previous one, can you not use the resources to fix this very simple problem?

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter

For now, Twitter holds the crown as the undisputed king of short-form content. But what if a serious scam-resistant contender ever comes along? Well, it won’t take much for major influencers like Mr. Renegade himself to jump ship.

Scam News

Convicted Thief Of $30 Million Crypto Scheme Allegedly Stole From Hundreds of US Investors

Published

on

Convicted Thief Of $30 Million Crypto Scheme Allegedly Stole From Hundreds of US Investors
Convicted Thief Of $30 Million Crypto Scheme Allegedly Stole From Hundreds of US Investors

Boaz “Bo” Manor, a convicted hedge fund scammer, has been charged with raising over $30 million from investors in an allegedly fraudulent initial coin offering. Prosecutors say he ditched his real identity, donned red hair, grew a beard and masqueraded as “Shaun MacDonald,” a blockchain entrepreneur. Prior to surfacing in New York, the notorious scammer spent four years in a Canadian prison after his bogus $730-million hedge fund evaporated in 2005. 

The latest indictment names Manor’s accomplice, Edith Pardo, and two firms, CG Blockchain Inc. and BCT Inc. SEZC, as defendants. The cohorts allegedly sold crypto asset securities between August of 2017 and September of 2018. According to the complaint, they also falsely claimed to have 20 hedge funds piloting technology to register transactions on a blockchain.

The SEC clarified,

“In reality, the defendants had only sent a prototype to a dozen funds, and none of the funds used it or paid for it.”

Joseph G. Sansone, chief of the SEC’s market abuse division, remarked,

“Manor’s brazen scheme to conceal his identity and criminal history deprived investors of essential information and allowed the defendants to take over $30 million from investors’ pockets.”

Pardo has been arrested, but authorities say Manor remains on the run.

Continue Reading

Scam News

Victims of Dunamiscoins Scam In Ugandan Petition Gov’t For What They Lost

Published

on

Victims of Dunamiscoins Scam In Ugandan Petition Gov’t For What They Lost
Victims of Dunamiscoins Scam In Ugandan Petition Gov’t For What They Lost

Over 5,000 victims of the alleged cryptocurrency pyramid scheme Dunamiscoins have petitioned the Ugandan Parliament asking to refund money lost in the scam.

Arthur Asiimwe, the leader of the petitioning group who presented the request to the Parliament’s speaker Rebecca Kadaga, claims that the government has licensed the alleged scam firm, according to an official announcement by the Parliament of Uganda on Jan. 16.

First spotted in early December 2019, Dunamiscoins is allegedly involved in defrauding over 10,000 people, causing them losses of around $2.7 million. The apparent scam company reportedly closed its offices just a month after opening, stealing money from its investors and employees after previously promising 40% returns on cash investments. Asiimwe emphasized that the Ugandan government must be held liable for the Dunamiscoins incident:

“Government licensed this company and gave it a go-ahead to work as a non-deposit taking financial institution; it carried out its duties as a microfinance company. They gave unrealistic bonuses.”

As two Dunamiscoins directors stood trial in early January, Asiimwe also pointed out that one of the key individuals behind the scam, Susan Awon, has still remained at large. The group leader expressed dissatisfaction with the status of the investigation, arguing that Ugandan authorities should take further steps to arrest the third director and refund the money.

Subsequently, Parliament’s speaker Kadaga promised to engage with the responsible state authorities in order to solve the issue. According to the official announcement by the Parliament, she said:

“Since you petitioned the President already, I will talk to him and invite the Minister of Finance, Uganda Micro Finance Regulatory Authority next week so we can forge a way forward.”

While Dunamiscoins victims apparently accuse their government of not taking necessary measures to prevent the scam, some media reports claim that Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni endorsed the firm earlier. According to local news publication The Independent, the victims told Kadaga that their faith in the company was driven by the President’s endorsement alongside constant media adverts.

 Meanwhile, Museveni has definitely taken a positive stance towards both blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies. Back in 2018, the President met with executives at major global crypto exchange Binance to discuss the developments in the industry.

Continue Reading

Scam News

Chainalysis Finds Terrorists Are Improving Their Crypto Financing Operations

Published

on

Chainalysis Finds Terrorists Are Improving Their Crypto Financing Operations
Chainalysis Finds Terrorists Are Improving Their Crypto Financing Operations

Earlier today, Jan. 17, the blockchain analysts identified Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades (AQB), Hamas’s military arm and noted terrorist organization, as the first confirmed case of terrorists using cryptocurrency to aid their activity. AQB used a website to generate a new Bitcoin address for each donor to deposit funds. It included a how-to video on donating with maximal anonymity. 

Compared to similar earlier campaigns, AQB raised as much money and garnered more donors but in less than half the time. Cryptocurrency has been linked to crime before, including Ponzi schemes and hate crimes. In other recent research, Chainalysis tracked $2.8 billion in Bitcoin from criminal enterprises to exchanges. Over 50% — $1.4 billion in Bitcoin — moved through major exchanges Binance and Huobi.

Crypto-enabled crime has caught the attention of regulators and government officials who would like greater oversight of digital currencies. Last year, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, speaking at a gathering of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), applauded global regulatory standards that would combat crypto crimes:

“The FATF will make sure that virtual asset service providers do not operate in the dark shadows […] This will enable the emerging FinTech sector to stay one-step ahead of rogue regimes and sympathizers of illicit causes…”

The FATF, whose 200 countries, including the U.S., promote measures to combat financial crime, now demand that exchanges know more about customers and transactions. More data will hopefully help identify money laundering and terrorism financing in exchange for institutions that largely lack the oversight needed to combat this growing problem. In a statement to Chainalysis, Binance CCO Samuel Lin said,

“Binance is committed to cleaning up financial crime in crypto and improving the health of our industry. We will continue to improve on our proprietary KYC and AML technology, as well as the third-party tools […] One of our core values at Binance is to protect our users…”

Binance, one of the largest crypto exchanges, exceeded $1 billion in profits last fall.

Continue Reading

TRENDING

Copyright © 2015 Crypto Global News Team.