Connect with us

Scam News

German Police Seize Second Crypto-Fueled Cyberbunker

Published

on

German Police Seize Second Crypto-Fueled Cyberbunker

German police have raided and shut down Cyberbunker 2.0, a decommissioned NATO bunker that housed dark web market servers and child porn. The bunker, hidden in the Mosel River town of Traben-Trarbach, held multiple stories of servers as well as “$41 million worth of funds allegedly tied to these markets,” according to security researcher Brian Krebs.

“Incredibly, for at least two of the men accused in the scheme, this was their second bunker-based hosting business that was raided by cops and shut down for courting and supporting illegal activity online,” said Krebs.

Police also raided locations in Netherlands, Poland, and Luxembourg in connection with the bunker’s activities. The bunker held multiple dark web markets including the financial scam site “Wall Street Market,” drug portal “Cannabis Road” and “Orange Chemicals,” a market for synthesized drugs.

Bunker schematic. (Image via German Police)

Police believe the bunker belonged to Herman Johan Xennt and Sven Kamphuis, two hackers who originally ran a similar bunker in the Netherlands. After a fire caused by an explosion in an ecstasy lab, they had to shut down their original bunker and lost their ability to run their servers in the Netherlands. They moved into the new Cyberbunker in 2013.

“They’re known for hosting scammers, fraudsters, pedophiles, phishers, everyone,” said Guido Blaauw, director of Disaster-Proof Solutions, the company that sold the original bunker to the pair. “That’s something they’ve done for ages and they’re known for it.”

The whole operation was deeply secretive and connected to organized crime. Xennt himself was quite a character. The Irish Sunday World tracked him down in 2015 saying:

Xennt, who looks like a Bond villain, lives in the bunker. He is pasty, white-skinned and sports long blonde hair. He rarely shows his face in public, but when he does, it is to meet with his close friend [an organized crime figure] who has moved to an apartment in the town below.

Scam News

Singapore Man – In Custody For Using Stolen Cloud Computing Power To Mine Cryptocurrency

Published

on

Singapore Man - In Custody For Using Stolen Cloud Computing Power To Mine Cryptocurrency
Singapore Man - In Custody For Using Stolen Cloud Computing Power To Mine Cryptocurrency

A Singaporean man faces a 34-year jail sentence after being charged for running a cryptocurrency mining operation using stolen identity data to gain access to cloud computing services.

Ho Jun Jia, also known as Matthew Ho, was charged under an indictment of 14 counts, allegedly for mining digital assets using stolen Amazon Web Servies (AWS) and Google Cloud computing power. Ho paid for these services using a credit card and identity data stolen from multiple victims in California and Texas. The indictment explained:

“HO used victims’ personal and stolen credit card information, along with phony email addresses, which he created, designed to spoof the authentic email account of identity-theft victims, to open accounts and to obtain access to cloud computing services.”

The indictment added that HO used his access to these computing services to mine cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and ether, which was sold and exchanged for fiat currency through online vendor websites. While the indictment didn’t disclose the amount of money made through these operations, it claimed that Ho consumed more than $5 million in unpaid cloud computing services.

Indeed, a U.S. Department of Justice press release said that for a brief period during the few months Ho’s scheme was active, it was one of AWS’s largest consumers of data by volume. The charges in the indictment remain allegations and the case is still being investigated by the Seattle office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. HO faces a total of 34 years in prison – up to 20 years for wire fraud, up to 10 years for access device fraud, and aggravated identity theft all to run consecutively.

Continue Reading

Scam News

Has A Student Attempted To Hack The West Virginia Voting Blockchain?

Published

on

Has A Student Attempted To Hack TheWest VirginiaVoting Blockchain
Has A Student Attempted To Hack The West Virginia Voting Blockchain?

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is investigating whether a student at the University of Michigan attempted to hack the West Virginia’s voting app.

United States Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, Mike Stuart, wrote that the FBI is investigating the “unsuccessful attempted intrusion” by an outside party to gain access to the Voatz app, a mobile app that was used to collect ballots from overseas and military voters in the 2018 election. Stuart said that during the West Virginia’s 2018 election cycle his office was alerted by West Virginia’s Secretary of State, Mac Warner, who identified activity that may have been an attempt to gain unauthorized access to the Voatz voting app. The blockchain-based application uses a multitude of security layers for identity verification, such as facial recognition, thumbprints, and voter-verified ballot receipts. Warner said:

“Every safeguard designed for the system was very successful and worked as designed: to gain as much information as possible, and protect the sanctity of the voters’ identities and ballots. Although the details of the investigation cannot be disclosed, we can say that no votes were altered, impacted, viewed or in any way tampered with.”

Warner added that there is no evidence “that even a single vote was changed in the 2018 election,” adding:

“Because of our hard work and our investments, all of our systems worked according to plan, and more robust security measures and protocols are being deployed ahead of 2020.”

Warner’s office communicated to the FBI that the activity of the attempt came from IP addresses linked to the University of Michigan. The FBI is now looking into a person or persons who might have tried to hack the voting app as part of a course on election security.

It was previously reported that Warner’s office communicated to the FBI that the activity of the attempt came from IP addresses linked to the University of Michigan. The FBI is now looking into a person or persons who might have tried to hack the voting app as part of a course on election security.

“The application of democratic governance that will be implemented by the Digital Party is based on the internal governance solution that Æternity uses for internal community decision-making, which is a completely new architecture, allowing greater participation of citizens in political decisions at all levels, with unalterable reliability.”

Continue Reading

Ethereum News

Hacker Gives Back Ethereum Domains They Got In Auction Bug

Published

on

Hacker Gives Back Ethereum Domains They Got In Auction Bug
Hacker Gives Back Ethereum Domains They Got In Auction Bug

The hacker who stole 17 Ethereum domain names during the Ethereum Name Service’s (ENS) auction decided to return them all.

On Oct. 4, digital-collectibles marketplace OpenSea said that all of the stolen ENS names were returned successfully and that bidding on domain names will restart again in the coming weeks. In the beginning of September, the ENS bidding process was exploited by a hacker who managed to steal 17 domain names for lower bids than other users placed. OpenSea, who ran the auction, explained that a bug distributed ENS domains to participants who did not hold the highest bid. The stolen domain names, which included apple.eth, defi.eth, wallet.eth, and pay.eth were all blacklisted and the hacker was promised an attractive offer for returning the domain names. OpenSea said:

“We appreciate the work you’ve done exposing vulnerabilities in the auction system. […] To compensate for the work you’ve done to expose these vulnerabilities, we’re prepared to offer you 25% of the winning bid price of each name you return. We’ll also refund your purchase price.”

One domain, coffeshop.eth, has already received a bid of 100 wrapped Ether (WETH), worth around $14,000 at press time.

Australian citizen Katherine Nguyen pleaded guilty to stealing $450,000 in XRP in January 2018. She hacked into the email account of a man with the same last name and proceeded to steal all of his XRP, before unlocking his account two days later. Cybercrime Squad Commander Arthur Katsogiannis said at the time:

“It’s a very significant crime and it’s the first we know of its type in Australia where an individual has been arrested and charged for the technology-enabled theft of cryptocurrency.”

Continue Reading

TRENDING

Copyright © 2015 Crypto Global News Team.